Pilgrims Shell Pendant

Art.Nr.: 00 Jako-Musch 2
4,19 €
( plus Shipping)
 
Pilgrims shell amulet - brass
Pilgrims shell amulet - brass
Pilgrims shell amulet - silver
Pilgrims shell amulet - silver
Pilgrims shell pendants
Pilgrims shell pendants
Pilrims shell pendant in nature
Pilrims shell pendant in nature
Metal Colour:
brass
brass  
4,19 ¤
Silver
Silver  
4,19 ¤
1-2 Days
2-3 Days
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Scallop pendant from the Middle Ages.

Here you can buy a pendant in the shape of a scallop shell, which was made after a medieval pilgrim's badge.

The scallop shell has been a symbol of the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela since the Middle Ages. In the pilgrims' homeland, the scallop shell was therefore a status symbol that conferred high prestige.

Link to the original scallop pendant...

The medieval scallop pendant measures 3 x 2.8 cm.

The pilgrim's shell is made of cast zinc alloy and is available in brass or silver.

A black cotton ribbon in 1 m length is included with the scallop pendant.



Originally, the scallop shells were used as scooping and drinking vessels on the coast of Galicia. It was a widespread custom to tie them to the pilgrim's staff or clothing on the way home after the pilgrimage.

The scallop shell thus became the sign visible to all that one had indeed reached that region which at that time meant the end of the known world - and had returned safe and sound. In the course of the late Middle Ages, resourceful businessmen were found who ran a flourishing souvenir trade in pewter scallops and sold pilgrim badges on a large scale.

So these metal pilgrim scallops soon became widespread and were proudly worn or pinned on as amulets. The scallop shell was also considered to have magical significance - it gave the wearer protection and an umbrella. And it was even able to heal the sick.

The Way of St. James is an ancient pilgrimage route that leads to the tomb of St. James in Santiago de Compostela, Spain, which was one of the most important pilgrimage sites in the Middle Ages, along with Rome and Jerusalem, and still is today. As the patron saint of pilgrims, St James is depicted with a shell on his hat or belt because according to legend, after his martyrdom in the Holy Land, the body of St James was washed ashore in Galicia, Spain, covered with scallops.

His remains were recovered and buried in a small chapel. Since the 7th century, the legends surrounding St. James have ensured a lively flow of pilgrims and brought influence and wealth to the church and the pilgrimage site in particular. Even today, the Way of St. James still has its appeal for modern pilgrims.

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Scallop pendant from the Middle Ages.

Here you can buy a pendant in the shape of a scallop shell, which was made after a medieval pilgrim's badge.

The scallop shell has been a symbol of the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela since the Middle Ages. In the pilgrims' homeland, the scallop shell was therefore a status symbol that conferred high prestige.

Link to the original scallop pendant...

The medieval scallop pendant measures 3 x 2.8 cm.

The pilgrim's shell is made of cast zinc alloy and is available in brass or silver.

A black cotton ribbon in 1 m length is included with the scallop pendant.



Originally, the scallop shells were used as scooping and drinking vessels on the coast of Galicia. It was a widespread custom to tie them to the pilgrim's staff or clothing on the way home after the pilgrimage.

The scallop shell thus became the sign visible to all that one had indeed reached that region which at that time meant the end of the known world - and had returned safe and sound. In the course of the late Middle Ages, resourceful businessmen were found who ran a flourishing souvenir trade in pewter scallops and sold pilgrim badges on a large scale.

So these metal pilgrim scallops soon became widespread and were proudly worn or pinned on as amulets. The scallop shell was also considered to have magical significance - it gave the wearer protection and an umbrella. And it was even able to heal the sick.

The Way of St. James is an ancient pilgrimage route that leads to the tomb of St. James in Santiago de Compostela, Spain, which was one of the most important pilgrimage sites in the Middle Ages, along with Rome and Jerusalem, and still is today. As the patron saint of pilgrims, St James is depicted with a shell on his hat or belt because according to legend, after his martyrdom in the Holy Land, the body of St James was washed ashore in Galicia, Spain, covered with scallops.

His remains were recovered and buried in a small chapel. Since the 7th century, the legends surrounding St. James have ensured a lively flow of pilgrims and brought influence and wealth to the church and the pilgrimage site in particular. Even today, the Way of St. James still has its appeal for modern pilgrims.

4.19

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